Tuesday, October 21, 2008

Blogging vs. Traditional Writing: Can't We All Be Friends?

Who knows what the future of blogging is and how the rise of blogs will impact traditional writing…I guess these are “exciting” times. Here’s a wonderful essay by Andrew Sullivan from The Atlantic that passionately advocates the beauty and purpose of each form and suggest that the world is—and will continue to be—large enough for both:

“If all this sounds postmodern, that’s because it is. And blogging suffers from the same flaws as postmodernism: a failure to provide stable truth or a permanent perspective. A traditional writer is valued by readers precisely because they trust him to have thought long and hard about a subject, given it time to evolve in his head, and composed a piece of writing that is worth their time to read at length and to ponder. Bloggers don’t do this and cannot do this—and that limits them far more than it does traditional long-form writing.

“A blogger will air a variety of thoughts or facts on any subject in no particular order other than that dictated by the passing of time. A writer will instead use time, synthesizing these thoughts, ordering them, weighing which points count more than others, seeing how his views evolved in the writing process itself, and responding to an editor’s perusal of a draft or two. The result is almost always more measured, more satisfying, and more enduring than a blizzard of posts. The triumphalist notion that blogging should somehow replace traditional writing is as foolish as it is pernicious. In some ways, blogging’s gifts to our discourse make the skills of a good traditional writer much more valuable, not less. The torrent of blogospheric insights, ideas, and arguments places a greater premium on the person who can finally make sense of it all, turning it into something more solid, and lasting, and rewarding.”

(Thanks to GalleyCat for this link.)


DC-area author Leslie Pietrzyk explores the creative process and all things literary.