Wednesday, October 5, 2016


Work in Progress will be on official hiatus until mid-November.

(Speaking of November, don’t forget my favorite Thanksgiving stuffing recipe, found here!)

Monday, October 3, 2016

On the Road

I had a delightful visit to St. Louis, meeting with students from University of Missouri—St. Louis and giving a reading, and I was interviewed for the school newspaper! (I also ate a Gooey Louie Butter Cake-filled cannoli from an Italian bakery, but that’s another story.)

Here’s the wonderful interview that Leah Jones conducted with me:

In addition to struggling with the difficult emotional content, Pietrzyk said that she also found herself questioning whether or not her grief was enough in comparison to other people’s trauma and grief. In the end though, Pietrzyk said though it may be selfish to write about one’s own grief, that’s fine. “Grief is universal…and yet it’s utterly individual,” Pietrzyk said. Pietrzyk avoids sentimentality in her stories through self-reflexive humor though.

Read the rest:

Friday, September 23, 2016

Tips on Giving a GREAT Craft Lecture at Your Low-Res MFA

~Dedicated to my past, present, and future fourth semester students

This semester, I’m working with two fabulous, about-to-graduate students in the Converse low-res MFA program, and part of the requirement of the mentoring is to help them adapt their big research paper written during the third semester into a lecture that they deliver before the entire faculty (and student body). YIKES! Usually, I work with them specifically on the nuts-and-bolts of their papers (cut your intro here; you need another source here) and also offer general thoughts on delivering such a talk…so why not help John and Manny with the specifics as usual, but this time give the whole wide world my general thoughts on delivering such a talk?! (I'll add that this advice probably applies to a number of settings, such as presenting a panel at AWP.)

Caveat: I don’t know how other low-res MFAs work or what, exactly, their requirements are, so I’m basing my suggestions on what I’ve seen works in our setting, which is a 20-25 minute talk followed by intense Q&A, all wrapped up within 30 minutes. Beyond the logistical parameters, each program will have its own culture and style, so if you’re reading this and graduating from a different program, be mindful that my thoughts are based on the Converse culture and style.

Still, in the end, a good lecture is a good lecture, so I think we can all learn something here. (Including me—I give a craft lecture at each residency and I assure you that every time is nerve-wracking. It’s a stressful situation, not only speaking in public, but speaking SMARTLY and effectively in public, and not really “public” because who cares what a bunch of strangers think—but speaking smartly to your peers and colleagues, the people we most want to impress, and the FACULTY.)

If that paragraph didn’t terrify you enough then perhaps this will: As a faculty member watching and evaluating these talks, I have come to realize that the craft lecture tends to be my greatest, most lasting impression of a student and how successful they were in the program. That may not seem fair—and, admittedly, I’ve worked with the fiction students in workshop and individually so I have a larger view of their scholarship and writing—but in the other genres, it’s only this talk and their graduating reading of creative work. And something about this final craft talk, the high pressure situation and the high stakes, really lock down how I feel about this person as he or she enters the writing community. Will I go out of my way to help? Will I happily introduce this person to my writer friends at AWP? Will I write a glowing letter of rec? (Not that I expect anyone to care about what I think beyond the program, and not that I have any sort of magical power to bestow on people…just that I have limited time and energy to help writers starting out, and I simply need a way to focus my enthusiasm. Trust me, my approval is no big deal…but if you’re about to give a craft lecture, do think about the teacher whose approval IS a big deal for you.)

So a few quick tips and/or observations:

I’m assuming you’ve worked with your mentor on the text of the talk. Basics: intro, topic, conclusion. Use appropriate examples from the text. Quote outside sources. Keep your focus tight. Twenty minutes is not a long time (though it may feel like an eternity as you stand there.)

We don’t require the use of technology in our talks, and it turns out that for better or worse, most of our faculty (and even guest speakers) shy away from it. I avoid technology—because it creates one more thing to worry about. The last thing I want to do on my craft lecture day is run around with cords and laptops, going freaking out of my mind because something won’t sync. Also, speakers staring at a slide on the screen seem to forget time and space and go on and on and on; it’s easy to over-speak with technology. Also, it’s a distraction for the audience as much as an enhancement…when will that creepy picture of Poe go away? Oh, look, the computer logged off. Etc. So, if you MUST use technology, be an expert in it and get to the room EARLY and test out EVERYTHING, including the lights and where you stand and how where you stand affects viewers from throughout the room. (How annoying is it to be a member of the audience who can’t read the poem on the screen because the speaker’s giant head is smack in the way?)

At Converse, you get no extra points for memorizing your talk or speaking off notecards vs. reading it off pieces of paper. In fact, we urge our students to read. I know that sounds “boring,” but I’d rather listen to a good reader vs. someone saying “um” every two seconds or someone who misjudges the time and runs out with four more points left on the outline. If you’ve done a lot of teaching/speaking, probably you can pull off speaking from notecards or an outline…but think about what I said above: this is your big presentation in front of your peers and faculty. Write out your talk, and read it in a clear, animated (but not crazily so! It’s not a performance!), PROFESSIONAL way. Double-space the pages, and maybe even use a larger font (if you don’t want to wear your glasses).

Handouts. I love them. (Sorry, trees…I try to use recycled paper.) What I love about them is that A) if the talk involves reading passages of text, it’s easier for the audience to follow along and feel engaged; and B) this is your chance to begin to learn the lovely realities of where “marketing” meets the literary world…don’t audiences like to take something home? Shouldn’t that something have your name on it? Speaking of handouts—either put them out on chairs before your talk or ask one of your friends to pass them out as you begin. DON’T spend valuable minutes of your craft talk wandering around distributing pieces of paper. DO staple them in advance! DO have more copies than you think you’ll need.

What to wear? Well, I can’t come over to your house to pick something out of your closet—as fun as that would be—and, in theory, you can wear whatever you want. But I’ll use this word again: PROFESSIONAL. Of all the things you will do in your graduate program and in the writing world to follow, this is probably the time where you want to look your best, where you want to dress up—not in a cocktail dress sort of way, but in a professional sort of way. Like a job interview. (That said, try not to wear anything so uncomfortable that it will distract you. If you can’t stand comfortably for 30 minutes in heels, then good lord, no, don’t wear them—no matter how cute they look.) Exude quirky personal style in your reading and your life…but please act professional at your lecture. (Men, this may mean a tie and/or a jacket. At least it probably means NOT a dirty T-shirt.)

Your craft talk will be followed by Q&A. I advise my students to think ahead to questions that may be asked. Lots of times the faculty will ask questions, and if you’ve been to enough talks (which you have, right, because you’ve been attending the talks of previous graduates, right?), patterns may emerge. This faculty member often wonders about such-and-such; another maybe brings up this-and-that. As you think about these patterns—and the possible questions ahead—you have two choices: prepare an answer to that question OR shut the door on that question in your talk. (As a quick example: I often ask questions about women writers…if your paper included four books, and two were by women, and you tell us upfront that in the interest of time you’re focusing on this particular book by a man…well, then I don’t have to ask my woman writer question.)

More on questions, because no matter how well you prepare, someone will ask a hard question or a question you can’t answer. It’s been my observation that the hard questions usually take two tacks:

1. It’s a question that is being asked because the questioner (usually faculty) sees a gaping hole in the talk and is giving you the chance to fill it.


2. The questioner is so excited about your talk that his/her brain is working overtime and here’s a question that takes the topic further. As hard as it can be at the moment, that type of question is a tremendous compliment, especially if it’s asked by a faculty member. You made something think!!

In either event, take a breath. Stave off panic for a moment: “What an interesting question.” And do your best! Rephrase the question if you must, to make sure you understand. And I think an answer is better than no answer—so if you’re really lost, don’t tell us that; instead, tell us something you DO know.

(The third type of hard question is the question that’s really a comment, or worse, someone grabbing the opportunity to talk about how much they know. Just listen avidly [which you really have to do in case a question finally DOES pop up!], agree, and move on, perhaps with mental gratitude that the blow-hard has soaked up some of your stressful question time.)

I’m sorry to have to tell you this, but maybe you should know: no questions means that the audience got lost or drifted off and is now afraid to ask anything in case it was covered. Unfortunately, no questions does not mean you covered everything perfectly. (Don’t tell anyone you heard this here, but maybe have a friend set up who will ask a question if no one else does.)

And lastly about the Q&A: I see that often people are very professional in their presentation, and suddenly it’s Q&A time and they’re slouching, fiddling with their hair, interrupting the questioner to crack a joke. I get it—the hard part feels over, and all that adrenaline needs a release. But in a presentation such as this, you are not finished until you sit down. Be, yes, PROFESSIONAL throughout. Yes, your teachers may be relaxed during their Q&A after their craft lectures (and, honestly, throughout their lectures maybe)—but, as unfair as it may be, that is different. They have, presumably, earned respect through their achievements. You, in this presentation are NOW EARNING that respect. “Earning” is different than “being given.”

All the elements about being a good speaker come into play here: don’t sway and shift your weight; make eye contact; don’t read too fast; exude confidence; pre-open the top on your bottle of water; don’t flip/fiddle with your hair…all the rest. The way to exude confidence is to practice, practice, practice! Film yourself, or practice in front of a mirror or in front of that friend who will tell you (kindly) what you’re doing wrong. Also, practice in front of that person who will tell you you’re absolutely brilliant because we all deserve to appear brilliant to someone.

I’m assuming you will also deliver a reading of your creative work to the faculty and student body. THAT is the time to offer (brief) thanks and gratitude; your craft lecture is NOT that time. Just greet the group, maybe make a tiny, mildly amusing comment if you have one and if you are the kind of person who can pull it off, then announce the title of your talk and jump in.

YOU CAN DO IT! We want you to succeed!

Honestly, there is nothing more exciting to me than listening to an impressive student craft lecture that teaches me something, that makes me think a new way about a topic; nothing more fun than running to join the cluster of well-wishers afterwards, showering compliments on a great job; nothing more thrilling than watching our students SOAR after these years of hard, hard work. High stakes, yes, but also high reward. Good luck, everyone!

While this post isn’t geared specifically to low-res MFA programs, here are my tips about giving a good reading:

More info about the Converse low-res MFA…we’d love to have you join us!

Friday, September 9, 2016

Invite These DMV/Baltimore Women Writers to Speak at Your Book Club!

Writers Available for Book Club Appearances
Courtesy of DC Women Writers

I belong to a fabulous and generous networking group of women writers in the DC/Baltimore area, and writer Kathy Flann had the brilliant idea of putting together a list of area writers who are willing to visit book clubs and talk about their writing/book/life/etc. Speaking for myself, I enjoy meeting with readers and listening to their insights about my book—always hearing something new that I hadn’t considered!—so if you are in a book club and have pondered inviting a writer, I say, DO IT! And please start here…these are wonderful writers, wonderful people, and wonderful books!

Contact information is provided, though in some cases you may have to get the email address through the author’s website.

And please check back periodically—I plan to update this list from time to time.


The third collection from an award-winning poet, examining the ways intimacy is both lost and gained over long distances. Available in paperback this winter.
A funny, conversational memoir that doubles as a cultural history of food allergies, weaving in research from science and medicine. Available in paperback now.

Sandrabeasley AT earthlink DOT net

www sandrabeasley DOT com


The perfect cocktail of naughtiness, heart, adventure and humor, The Trouble with Lexie is a wild and poignant story of the choices we make to outrun our childhoods—and the choices we have to make to outrun our entangled adult lives.

Jessicaanyablau AT mac DOT com
www jessicaanyablau DOT com

SHADOW PLAY (Turning Point Books)
Hypnotic and provocative by turns, this novella-in-verse retraces a journey across Asia in search of the marriage that faltered in its wake. Part love poem, part elegy, the book enacts the conflict between memory and estrangement. In his introduction, novelist Vikram Chandra calls it "an incarnation of the ineluctable passage of time itself."

jodybolz AT aol DOT com


THE HOPES OF SNAKES  (Beacon Press) 
An essay collection, with a rare endorsement by poet Mary Oliver, that celebrates the forgotten lives of animals and women in the northeast. Described as "full of rapture, mystery, and surprise . . . a keeper, a teacher . . . "

 ANIMALS/BODIES (Finishing Line Press)
A poetry chapbook with poems about women, birth, and animals. Awarded the 2015 Chapbook Award from the New England Poetry Society founded by Robert Frost.

LCouturier AT me DOT com   
www lisacouturier DOT com


The story of a German woman contracted to work on a farm in Iceland shortly after WW II but who cannot let go of those she lost during the war. Based on a documented migration.

solegg24 AT gmail DOT com              
www solveigeggerz DOT com

*SUE EISENFELD (DMV area only; unable to travel to Baltimore)

A hiking journey through the history of the lost communities of Shenandoah National Park in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains (literary nonfiction).

www sueeisenfeld DOT com


GET A GRIP  (Winner of the George Garrett Award, Texas Review Press)
In this collection of short stories, we meet Estonian brothers trekking from their blighted neighborhood to a college interview, a TV meteorite hunter in town to search for otherworldly treasure, and other colorful Baltimore characters. Named a Best Book by Baltimore Magazine and Baltimore City Paper. Winner of National Indie Excellence Award and International Book Award.  Writer grew up in NoVa.

kathyflann AT yahoo DOT com
www kathyflann DOT com


LUCKY THAT WAY  (Oct. 2013, University of Missouri Press)
Lucky That Way won the American Society of Journalists and Authors 2014 Outstanding Book Prize. Gerhardt is also a frequent contributor to The Washington Post.

gerhardt AT umd DOT edu
http:// pamelagerhardt DOT com


This humorous novel is set in 1989's New York music scene. Jill and her mostly middle class co-workers at Mega Big Record Label are tasked with finding the next big 'gangsta' rapper. They fluctuate between alliances and rivalries, tripping over the stereotypes of race, class, and musical genre.

Garine AT rocketmail DOT com


HER OWN VIETNAM (Shade Mountain Press)
A nurse who served in Vietnam must make peace with her history on the eve of the war in Iraq.

lynnkanter AT gmail DOT com
https:// lynnkanter DOT com


THE DARK PATH TO THE RIVER [originally published by Saybrook/Norton and reissued by the Author's Guild Backinprint series]
A political thriller about strong-minded women and men, The Dark Path to the River tells a love story that moves between Wall Street and Africa.  Barbara Kingsolver has said, "Well-written, thematically  rich. I fell in love with the characters. I didn't want the pleasure to end."

 Jlajoanne AT aol DOT com


Its been 20 years since Sam Pinski, a 33-year-old novelist, has spent the Fourth of July with her family at their cabin on the Susquehanna River in Maryland, and she dreads confronting everyone at once: her father Karl, a manic-depressive former steelworker on disability; her mother Pat, a retired secretary in professional-grade denial; her ex-boyfriend, Michael; her friend Eve; and her brother Steve, who ran away to New Jersey to play in a Bruce Springsteen cover band. 

jen.michalski AT gmail DOT com
jenmichalski DOT com


HARMONY (Pamela Dorman Books)
A family struggling to raise an autistic child gives up their ordinary life to follow a charismatic parenting guru to New Hampshire to help start a "family camp."

carolynparkhurst AT yahoo DOT com

THIS ANGEL ON MY CHEST [winner of the 2015 Drue Heinz Literature Prize, University of Pittsburgh Press]
Linked collection of short stories about the death of a young husband, based on the author's life, many set in NoVa.

lesliepietrzyk AT gmail DOT com
www lesliepietrzyk DOT com


YOU MAY SEE A STRANGER is an “honest and sharply observed linked story collection, spanning the life of Miranda Weber from her teens through her late 40s. The opening story, “Driver’s Education,” sets up many of the collection’s themes as Miranda learns to drive while gaining insights into herself, her sexuality, and the class and racial tensions in ...Washington, D.C...Together, these smart, artful stories capture a woman’s life and the moments that define her.“ --Publishers Weekly starred review.

www paulawhyman DOT com
Twitter: @paulawhyman


The perfect cocktail of naughtiness, heart, adventure and humor, The Trouble with Lexie is a wild and poignant story of the choices we make to outrun our childhoods—and the choices we have to make to outrun our entangled adult lives.


A book of fiction set across Africa that follows five women as their lives intersect in unexpected and sometimes explosive ways.

susi AT susiwyss DOT com


MAN ALIVE! (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux)
Lightning strikes Dr. Owen Lerner at Rehoboth Beach, sending his entire family into freefall in this novel of “devastating humor and rare generosity.”  
Washington Post Notable Book

mkzur AT verizon DOT net
www mkzuravleff DOT com

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Link Corral: CNF ~ Book PR ~ "The Night Of" ~ Pink Gin!

What’s on your mind these days?

~If it’s working on memoir/CNF, read this piece in Brevity:

“Where memoirists often get stuck is finding their own dramatic action. The situation felt incredibly dramatic while we were in it, because we were navigating the hundred small actions it took to get through every day. But in retrospect, what do they all add up to?”

~If it’s book publicity, read this piece on LitHub:

“If you’re a writer who’s about to publish a book, whatever is being spent on publicity doesn’t mean that you don’t have to get involved as well. Authors are asked to find people to blurb their books prior to release; they’re asked to reach out to people who will be willing to review the books; they’re asked to maintain their websites and Twitter accounts and Facebook pages. The difference between being published with a “Big 5” publisher versus a small or independent press is not necessarily how much work the writers have to do, but how much that work gets noticed.”

~If you’re already missing “The Night Of,” as I am, first read this smart commentary on The New York Times and then go watch the Bogart movie referenced, “In a Lonely Place,” which we recently saw and which was startlingly dark and wonderful:

A pox on the NYTimes that won’t let me cut & paste one tiny sentence (!), so I’ll quickly paraphrase that the writer notes that Naz was both changed by his experience and revealed, which I think is a tidy way to characterize his journey and is what made this show so fascinating (and harrowing) to watch. This and “The People vs. O.J. Simpson” and “The Americans” have been by far my favorite TV shows of 2016. Okay, and I'll admit to laughing to "Vice Principals" even though I suspect maybe I shouldn't be....

~Finally, if you've been longing for a pink martini, try this Pink Gin by The Bitter Truth. It's available in good liquor stores, or you can order here:

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Writing Salon at the National Gallery--FREE Prompt Writing

Thanks to writer Cheryl Aubin for alerting me to this series, the Writing Salon at the National Gallery. Writing to beautiful artworks for FREE! What could be better?

Now online: The 2016-2017 Writing Salon schedule

Mark your calendars now and come find inspiration for original pieces of creative writing in the Gallery's permanent collection. This program is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required due to limited space. Registration opens online at noon on the Tuesday before each new topic. A complete list of registration dates is available on the Writing Salon webpage.

Character: The Spoken Word
September 30; October 1, 2, 15, 16

Poetry: Words in Motion
January 6, 7, 8, 14, 15

Memoir: Art from Life
February 24, 25, 26; March 18, 19

Setting: The Power of Place
April 21, 22, 23, 29, 30

More information:

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Fall 2016 Events!

I will be out and about this fall, in DC, Baltimore, St. Louis, and Indiananapolis--sometimes reading with others, sometimes on my own; sometimes reading from THIS ANGEL ON MY CHEST, sometimes not. I'd love to see you and/or your friends at any of these events...or better yet, feel free to road trip to all of them!!

Friday, September 9
7:30 PM
Imagistic Reading Series
Hillyer Arts Center / Dupont Circle, DC
9 Hillyer Ct NW
Washington, DC 20008
For Imagistic, we invite writers to respond to work by artists.  Each writer chooses an image and then responds with a piece of flash fiction of up to 1,000 words – a translation from the language of image into the language of words. For the first Imagistic in Washington, D.C., seven writers are responding to images by seven artists:

Leslie Pietrzyk, writing from work by Keith Morrison
Kyle Dargan / Larry Spaid
Paula Whyman / Angela Bartram
David Gewanter / Dove Bradshaw
Janet Passehl / Alyssa Salomon
Carole Burns / Janet Passehl
Rhian Edwards / Paul Edwards

Curated by Carole Burns and Paul Edwards, Imagistic was begun in 2012 as part of the UK’s National Flash Fiction Day. Some of the images chosen provide a clear narrative hook, a sense of place, a moment in time or an action interrupted.  Others are more obscure - through a glass darkly.  

Wednesday, September 14, 2016
Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis
7PM ~ 9PM
IUPUI Campus Library
Lily Auditorium - UL130
755 W. Michigan Street 
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Sunday, September 25
CityLit Stage at the Baltimore Book Festival
4:30pm – 5:30pm
Inner Harbor Promenade by the Maryland Science Center
Baltimore, MD

More New Releases
The second of two sessions celebrating the recent publications of local literati on both Saturday and Sunday. Though a battle between the sexes was not intended, this hour features Susan Coll (The Stager), Courtney Sender (The Kenyon Review, Glimmer Train, American Short Fiction), and Leslie Pietrzyk (This Angel on My Chest, Pitt Drue Heinz Lit Prize). Not to be outdone by the male writers in session one, this hour promises to be just as engaging, with linked stories each about a different young woman whose husband dies suddenly and unexpectedly, a novel that is a dark comedy of real estate and rabbits, and stories that range from a fictional second uprising in Baltimore, one year after the first, to a tale of a girl with a hundred-pound heart. Hosted by Marion Winik, Associate Professor, University of Baltimore MFA in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts.

Thursday, September 29th, 2016
University of Missouri–St. Louis
7:00 PM
UMSL 1 University Boulevard
SSB Room 331 -
James S. McDonnell Conference Room
St. Louis, MO 63121

November 20, 2016
5:30 p.m.
Reston Reading Series
Reston's Used Book Shop
 Lake Anne Village Center
1623 Washington Plaza N
Reston, VA

With Nathan Leslie and Eric D. Goodman


DC-area author Leslie Pietrzyk explores the creative process and all things literary.